Journal of ISSN: 2377-4312JDVAR

Dairy, Veterinary & Animal Research
Mini Review
Volume 3 Issue 4 - 2016
Production Statistics of Meat in Kerala
Anu George1*, Arun George1 and Shibu K Jacob3
1Centre for Livestock Development and Policy Research, India
2Regional Research and Training Centre, India
Received: June 01, 2016 | Published: June 30, 2016
*Corresponding author: Anu George, Centre for Livestock Development and Policy Research, Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, PRRA-62, Pazhaya Road, Medical College PO, Trivandrum, Kerala, India, PIN-695011, Tel: 09447112165; Email:
Citation: George A, George A, Jacob SK (2016) Production Statistics of Meat in Kerala. J Dairy Vet Anim Res 3(4): 00089. DOI: 10.15406/jdvar.2016.03.00090

Abstract

Kerala is one of the most meat consuming states in India. It is considered that 70 per cent of the human population is highly inclined to non-vegetarian food items, especially during festivals. As a result, the meat production in Kerala is showing a significant increase from 1995 to 2012. The study attempted to present the real statistics of production of meat in Kerala from the secondary data available.

Introduction

Introduction

The flesh or organs typically of an animal or bird is considered as meat. There are various legal definitions of meat in different countries. The flesh of cattle, pigs and sheep is distinguished from that of poultry by the term red meat, while the flesh of poultry (chicken, turkey, duck, pigeon, and guinea fowl) is termed white meat. Meat from non-domesticated animals is termed as game meat. The relative importance of these various sources of meat in the diet varies from region to region and has different cultures. Many that are rejected for various reasons in one culture are fully accepted in others. In the Indian sub-continent beef is socially and economically perceived as being second class compared with chevon, mutton and poultry, while the reverse is true in most industrialized countries. In many regions of developing countries meat production is carried out with efficiency, and slaughter and processing are based on many of recent scientific developments.

China is the top most meat producing country in the world for the last ten years. United States of America (USA) and Brazil are the second and third largest producers [1]. In the world meat market, pig meat and poultry meat are having a higher market value than bovine and ovine meat. India is the 6th leading producer of meat with a production of 6.29 million tonnes. Meat is having a long tradition in Indian history.

India has a livestock population of 480 million, which includes 218 million cattle and 115 million buffaloes [2]. India’s contribution of beef and buffalo meat together to the world’s total meat production is four percent, while that of poultry meat is two per cent. The production of meat and meat products has shown an impressive growth.India has exported buffalo meat valued Rupees 17,400.59 crores in the financial year 2012-2013 [3].

In India the state Uttar Pradesh (UP) is the top producer of meat. UP produced 956 million kilograms meat in 2012. Andhra Pradesh (AP) is the second largest producer of meat. The rank of Kerala achieved in the production of meat in 2012 is 6th and it was in the same position ten years earlier also. That means, Kerala has a stable position in the meat production throughout these years. The average annual growth rates of meat production in UP, AP, West Bengal and Kerala are 29, 8, 10, and 35 respectively. The meat production in Kerala shows an increasing trend from 1995 to 2012 (Table 1).

The meat production in Kerala is having a significant increase from 1995 to 2012. In the beginning of 1995 the meat production was 35324 metric tonnes, and from the latest available data of 2012 the meat production is 241957 metric tonnes. There are 2100 slaughtering houses in Kerala, among that 101 are authorized, 1997 are unauthorized and 2 are mechanized units. An unpublished data obtained regarding the species wise meat production in Kerala is presented in Table 2 for reference [4].

From the Figure 1 it can be seen that the meat production is steadily increasing when compared to the previous year data and Figure 2 depicts the district wise production statistics of meat in Kerala during the year 2011-12.

Kerala is one of the most meat consuming states in India. It is considered that 70 per cent of the human population is highly inclined to non-vegetarian food items, especially during festivals. Serving non-vegetarians food items in any social gatherings has become a trend in the life style of Keralites. Usually Hindus are less meat consuming population, where as Christians and Muslims are large consumers of meat. Kerala’s non vegetarian cuisine includes chicken, duck, turkey, guinea fowl, quail, emu, goose, pork, chevon, mutton, beef, etc. Among these there is a high demand for chicken, kara beef, pork, chevon and mutton (Table 3).

Year

Total Meat Production
(in ‘000 MT)

1995-1996

35324.00

1996-1997

36112.00

1997-1998

38102.00

1998-1999

39280.00

1999-2000

40538.00

2000-2001

40936.00

2001-2002

41710.00

2002-2003

42804.00

2003-2004

47667.00

2004-2005

54189.00

2005-2006

55923.00

2006-2007

60115.00

2007-2008

60191.00

2008-2009

110314.00

2009-2010

102026.56

2010-2011

108400.35

2011-2012

241956.64

Table 1: Trend of meat production in Kerala.

Organised Sector

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Cattle

31,059

28,073

53,410

48,804

Buffalo

19,457

23,789

44,472

41,820

Goat & Sheep

5,554

5,129

8,910

7,980

Pig

4,044

3,202

3,555

3,422

Total Meat Production

60,114

60,193

1,10,347

1,02,026

Poultry Meat Production

16,184

17,390

13,749

15,482

Total Meat Reduction
(including unauthorised sector)

1,96,526

1,97,969

3,44,790

3,21,560

Table 2: Species wise meat production in Kerala from Organised and unauthorized sector (in Tonnes).

Year

Per capita Availability of Meat (in grams)

1997-1998

6

1998-1999

6

1999-2000

6

2000-2001

7

2001-2002

8

2002-2003

8

2003-2004

7

2004-2005

7

2005-2006

7

2006-2007

6

2007-2008

6

2008-2009

10

2009-2010

10

2010-2011

10

2011-2012

35

Table 3: Per capita availability of meat in Kerala.

Figure 1: Total meat production in Kerala (in ‘000 MT).

Figure 2: Meat production in Kerala 2011-2012 (in '000 MT).

District Wise Meat Availability in Kerala

The consumption of meat varies from district to district of Kerala. Idukki is the district with highest per capita meat availability of 75 grams in the period 2011-2012 (Table 4). Idukki is having good pastures and it may the reason for high production in meat. Since the availability is high, the other nearby districts of Kerala may import the meat from Idukki for their daily needs. Wayanad is the second highest in per capita availability of meat. Wayanad is the district in Kerala with lowest population density. So there is a chance of exporting meat and meat products from Wayanad.

The availability and consumption are two difference terms. If the availability is more or high, it is not mandatory that the consumption is also high. The consumption may become less because of so many reasons such as cost, vegetarianism, fasting, animals affected with zoonotic diseases etc. So the real way of assessing whether the recommended requirement of meat is consumed is only through assessing the consumption pattern.

District

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Thiruvananthapuram

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

19

Kollam

6

5

9

11

10

20

17

20

41

Pathanamthitta

4

3

4

4

4

7

7

9

44

Alappuzha

8

6

7

9

9

14

15

14

39

Kottayam

10

6

8

8

7

9

7

8

35

Idukki

16

21

17

15

14

22

22

22

75

Ernakulum

8

9

10

9

10

18

18

16

37

Thrissur

20

17

10

4

4

6

6

7

27

Palakkad

1

1

1

2

1

2

5

4

23

Malappuram

6

7

7

7

8

13

11

15

35

Kozhikode

5

6

5

4

4

8

6

5

27

Wayanad

9

12

10

7

6

9

8

9

60

Kannur

5

7

6

5

5

7

5

4

28

Kasaragod

6

6

7

7

7

7

6

5

32

Table 4: Per capita availability of meat in the districts of Kerala (in grams).

References

  1. FAO (2013) FAO production year book, FAO, Rome, Italy.
  2. Government of India (2012) Basic Animal Husbandry Statistics. Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying & Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture. Government of India. India
  3. FICCI (2016) Overview of the Indian Buffalo Meat Value Chain. p. 1-94.
  4. The Hindu daily dated 30.07.2015.
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