MOJ ISSN: 2381-179X MOJCR

Clinical & Medical Case Reports
Editorial
Volume 4 Issue 4 - 2016
Integrative & Functional Medicine
George Grant*
World organization of Natural Medicine, Canada
Received: June 22, 2016| Published: July 11, 2016
*Corresponding author: George Grant, World organization of Natural Medicine, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada, Tel: 416 562 3140; Email:
Citation: Grant G (2016) Integrative & Functional Medicine. MOJ Clin Med Case Rep 4(4): 00100. DOI: 10.15406/mojcr.2016.04.00100

Editorial

Many Americans have never heard of integrative medicine, but this holistic movement has left its imprint on many of the nation’s hospitals, universities, and medical schools. Treating the Whole Person Both doctors and patients alike is bonding with the philosophy of integrative medicine and its whole-person approach designed to treat the person, not just the disease. IM, as it’s often called, depends on a partnership between the patient and the doctor, where the goal is to treat the mind, body, and spirit, all at the same time.

While some of the therapies used may be non conventional, a guiding principle within integrative medicine is to use therapies that have some high-quality evidence to support them. Conventional and Alternative Approaches the Duke Center for Integrative Medicine is a classic model of integrative care. It combines conventional Western medicine with alternative or complementary treatments, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage, biofeedback, yoga, and stress reduction techniques all in the effort to treat the whole person. Proponents prefer the term “complementary” to emphasize that such treatments are used with mainstream medicine, not as replacements or alternatives. Integrative medicine got a boost of greater public awareness and funding after a landmark 1993 study. That study showed that one in three Americans had used an alternative therapy, often under the medical radar.

In the past decade, integrative medicine centers have opened across the country. According to the American Hospital Association, the percentage of U.S. hospitals that offer complementary therapies has more than doubled in less than a decade, from 8.6% in 1998 to almost 20% in 2004. Another 24% of hospitals said they planned to add complementary therapies in the future. Patients usually pay out of pocket, although some services such as nutritional counseling, chiropractic treatments, and biofeedback are more likely to be reimbursed by insurance. Functional medicine is a personalized, systems-oriented model that empowers patients and practitioners to achieve the highest expression of health by working in collaboration to address the underlying causes of disease.

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